Direct Marketing

Junk mailDiane MacEachern has recently written a how-to post for North Americans to decrease the amount of junk mail turning up in their letterbox. I also suffer from that problem, except I live on 5 acres and rolled up collections of inked ads are thrown into the long grass at the front of our property every week. I never take the rubber band off, I never look at the messages, I collect them after I’ve mowed and dispose of them.

When we consider the lifecycle of a product, we have to look at the entire life: for a direct mail piece let’s consider growth and harvest of trees; transport of trees to make paper; transport to printer; use of inks, water and energy for printing, distribution to homes, distribution to tip. That’s a simplistic view of course, but now overlay the real purpose of the project – a sale. CMO Council lists a whole page of varying facts about direct mail, including this one, “Direct mail — yes junk mail via snail mail — still reigns supreme, offering response rates of 1.1 to 1.4% versus 0.03% for email, 0.04% for Internet display ads…”

Diane offers some good ideas for the consumer to restrict the mail arriving, but given that “44% of direct mail is never opened” (CMO Council again), and has such low take-up rates of “1.1 t0 1.4%”, I really believe that direct mail has to be carefully considered as a means of promotion in a world where resources are precious and finite. As a graphic designer, I can be part of the solution.

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Reuse, and extend lifecycle.

timber and glass bathroom cabinet ready for fix-upMy first post: We’re renovating four old units into a family home over the next year. The building is from the 40s and is original. Not detail-gorgeous original, just old and falling-apart original. The kitchens have a sink with underneath chipboard cupboard, and there’s a chipboard pantry. Bathrooms with (rusty) water heater in a cupboard. Get the idea?

But, my fabulous designer-friend Kate, is doing all the architectural details and she was the first to spot a couple of handsome pieces. In the spirit of Fuad-Luke I am aiming to reuse, extending the lifecycle of building materials where I can. Not only is it good for Earth, it will save some money and add to the character of the new build.

I’ll show you some of our ideas over the next year: here is a bathroom wall cabinet which needs some TLC but is made predominantly from timber and glass – and check out the etched palm trees on the glass. Perfect for Brisbane.